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« Wisley visitors vote for their favorite bulbs | Main | Variegated alchemilla update »

June 05, 2008

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Mark Denee

I certainly hope they will be "hardier". So far, I've been disappointed by most of the "new" Coreopsis in recent years (e.g. 'Autumn Blush', 'Pinwheel', etc.).

Here's to Darrell et al doing some appropriate testing and trialling before releasing.

The collage of pics is very cool though!

Graham Rice

I don't think the problem is that they're not hardy, it's the pretence by some in the industry that they are. They're superb in large summer containers, for example, and no one expects most summer container plants to last the winter. They're good plants - used in the right way. Breeders and nurseries just need to be more open with their customers

Mark Denee

The problem is that some propagators are introducing new plants with "very hopeful" hardiness zones (i.e. with little testing and trialling).

Don't tell me it's hardy to zone 5 when in reality it's hardy to zone 7. I've always been a big proponent of the zones being useful "guidelines" only, but that has certainly been abused in the past.

The bottom line IMHO: more testing and trialling before releasing.

Graham Rice

I agree entirely. The problem is that the whole new plant field has become so competitive that there's a tendency to cut corners and rush new plants out prematurely.

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